Category Archives: ultramarathons

Day 41–We All Get Wrinkles


Do you remember being 12 years old and counting the days until you turned  16?  The milestone of qualifying for a driver’s license.

After that, the next big age goal seems to be legal drinking age.

Then what? What milestone age comes next?

Many people look back and long to be 12 again, or just stay in their twenties. Who really wants to grow old?

The reality is, we all get wrinkles.

It’s not the fact we get wrinkles, as much as what we decide to do with them.

In his essay, Running into Old Age, George Sheehan wrote,

“What I have lost I can afford to lose. What I have gained is something I cannot do without.”
George Sheehan was a shining example of a runner & writer. He wrote prolifically and ran to match his writing. He kept on running and writing throughout his life.

It’s inevitable that with age runners are bound to lose some speed and endurance.  Sheehan noticed his race times getting slower and slower, but instead of fighting these realities he decided to focus on the positives.

With the added years, miles, and written and read words he noticed added insight and wisdom.

So how are we runners & writers going to face our future? With dread or as the well read?

One of the best things about being a runner and writer is what you learn along the way. There’s no avoiding the knowledge and insight that will come with long runs and writing.

Some of the best writers and long distance runners are the seasoned veterans.

No matter what your age, embrace it. Start running and keep running. Give writing a try and give it time, it only gets better with age.

Dr. Sheehan came to the conclusion, when I push to the limit, I am a boy again-an untried youth listening to the wisdom of my body.”

Do you feel getting older as a runner or writer is positive or negative?

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Filed under running, running and writing, ultramarathons, Uncategorized, writing

10 Ways to Stay Motivated for your First UltraMarathon



 

  1.    Write Out a Schedule–As soon as you decide you’re going to run an ultra write out a plan. Take your time and have fun writing the plan. Be reasonable with your schedule and limitations. Throughout the plan add rewards for completing significant long training runs. Your plan should also include enough leeway for unplanned obstacles and rest days.
  2.     Talk About It, A Bunch–The more people you tell your running an ultra, the more people that will be asking you how your training is going. The more people you tell, the more support you will have. And your possibility of finding training partners increases.
  3.      Challenge a Friend–Having a friend that is training for the same race is a terrific way to keep you motivated. You won’t want to let them down, and your competitive side will prod you to get out on those early morning runs. It’s also nice to have a friend to accompany you on those long training runs.
  4.      Follow Ultra Bloggers–There are a lot of ultrarunning bloggers out there, and if reading about their adventures doesn’t motivate you, not much will. Check out: A Trail Runner’s Blog, An ultrarunner’s blog, ultrarunner’s insight blog.
  5.      Build Your Own–Start your own blog. Right from day one you can share your ultrarunning experiences. You won’t want to let your followers down and writing about your running will keep you running.
  6.       Listen Up–When I’m out on a long run, nothing gets me pumped more than listening to a fellow ultrarunner talking about their training and racing stories. Here are a few podcasts to get you started: ultrarunnerpodcast, running podcasts.
  7.      Be Well Read–If you haven’t read Born to Run by Chris McDougall, do it. Even if you are not going to run long it’s a great read. Dean Karnazes book, Ultramarathon Man will also get you rearing to run long.
  8.      Write Out Your Race–Before your ultra, write out on paper your perfect race. Get as detailed as you like, be sure to include your lows and highs. By doing this you will see you can finish, all you need is positive thinking. And, of course, some training.
  9.      Sign On the Dotted Line–If you haven’t signed up for an ultramarathon yet, what’s holding you back? Once you register and pay you will be even more determined you will run it.
  10.   Love to Run–No matter how the training, racing and aftermath go, just love the run. Every run you go on, remember, loving to run is the original and strongest motivator.

What motivates you to run ultramarathons?

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Filed under running, ultramarathons, ultrarunning